Extreme Bathroom Users: Lapeyre Embraces the Elderly
May05

Extreme Bathroom Users: Lapeyre Embraces the Elderly

A major French furniture company challenges an international team of students to redesign the bathroom experience for the elderly – and receives a product that ends up changing the way their organization approaches senior customers.

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Early Approaches: The US Tax Forms Simplification Project
May01

Early Approaches: The US Tax Forms Simplification Project

This case concerns one of the earliest attempts by design thinkers at designing a large, complex system. It shows that design approaches in the public sector can look back at a long history. And it reveals how design thinking within the organization must include members of the whole organization in the design process.

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Designer Nights Out: Good Urban Planning Can Reduce Drunken Violence
May01

Designer Nights Out: Good Urban Planning Can Reduce Drunken Violence

Violent crime and the loss of young lives in assaults pose a frightening problem in many urban city districts. This case from Australia shows how the ‘Designing Out Crime Research Center’ aimed to devise solutions for Sydney’s Kings Cross area, recently renowned for its alcohol-fuelled violence.

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Three Good Reasons for Turning to Design in Germany’s Public Policy
Nov04

Three Good Reasons for Turning to Design in Germany’s Public Policy

The idea of citizen involvement is as old as the concept of democracy itself. But instead of collaborating with public representatives, civic initiatives are working more and more against the governmental sector. This is also reflected in a German word that has been recently coined: “Wutbürger” (literally: “enraged citizen”).

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Starting Up with Design Thinking: The Story of LinkedIn’s Pulse
Jun29

Starting Up with Design Thinking: The Story of LinkedIn’s Pulse

We met Akshay Kothari, one of the two co-founders of Pulse, a business reader app that was famously displayed by Steve Jobs at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in 2010 and was later acquired by LinkedIn for 90 Million Dollars. Akshay and his business partner Ankit Gupta started developing Pulse in 2010 when they were still students at Stanford.

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